Whale Riding Weather

written by bryden macdonald

Zee Zee’s first production, Whale Riding Weather captures a small moment in the smaller life of Lyle an aging gay man trapped in a downward spiral. This critically acclaimed production established Zee Zee Theatre as a force to be reckoned with, and a testing ground for young artists to work alongside Vancouver’s finest theatre veterans.

  • Directed by Cameron Mackenzie
  • Featuring Allan Morgan, Jeff Gladstone & Jon Lachlan Stewart
  • Set Design by Marina Szijarto
  • Lighting Design by Jeff Harrison
  • Costume Design by Sydney Cavanagh
  • Stage Management by Jillian Perry
  • Production Assistance by Emma Slipp

Awards & Recognition

“Despite gloomy predictions of the future of indie theatre in these trying economic times it’s heartening to see ever more new and driven companies springing up in Vancouver. Companies with something to say, and the desire to say it from the stage. Companies with more passion than money, and the will to get the production up regardless. Companies like Zee Zee Theatre. I’m proud to see independent Vancouver artists like Cameron Mackenzie taking the task this seriously. If we keep going like this, Vancouver could very well be a formidable force in presenting indie theatre to the world as a profitable and sustainable industry.” -Simon Ogden, The Next Stage
“Playing Auto, Jeff Gladstone delivers a performance that defines a new high-water mark in his career. His work feels so deeply internal that it’s like his character is imploding. And when Auto tries to emerge from psychic hiding to respond to Jude’s touch, it obviously hurts so much that you can’t help but be moved… A lot of theatre is boring because it’s emotionally timid. MacDonald’s script and director Cameron Mackenzie’s production aren’t afraid to ooze bodily fluids.” -Colin Thomas, Georgia Straight
“Under Cameron Mackenzie’s sensitive direction for Zee Zee Theatre, Gladstone and Jon Lachlan Stewart (as Jude) are tender and as playful as a pair of bear cubs. Stewart, particularly, is so sweet–almost cherubic–that good feeling simply flows from him. I don’t remember the first time I saw the play feeling such goodness emanating from this character. When Jude finally does break through to Auto and then to Lyle, it’s like the clouds have cleared and the sun has broken through. There are a couple of embraces that just about rip your heart Out.” -Jo Ledingham, The Courier